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April 17 2015

hungryguidebook43

Big Dog Rescue Teams Up With Earl Stewart Toyota

Just recently I have in fact fulfilled a variety of brand-new owners who have handled dogs through internet sites like Gumtree. If you are thinking of buying a dog through such a website, switch off the computer system and walk away. Gumtree and similar is a website embellished to flog things that people do not want any longer consisting of pet dogs and in my mind, that need to not be an area website for new canine owners to look for their cherished addition to their household. It has to similarly be born in mind that I have been putting all the concentrate on the possible owners themselves, when in truth it is the personnel at the rehoming centres that make the decision on whether a canine or cat is an outstanding match for a person/family or living area. Individuals who work at shelters and rehoming centres are absolute angels and truly do appreciate the animals that they help to look after; they truly want every animal to go to an environment that is ideal for them. FIRST OF ALL the pet dogs originating from Ireland belong to the UK so why is it an issue whether the pet dogs come from England, Scotland, Wales or Ireland as long as it is being conserved and conserved and entering a new loving home. These insufficient, neglected and severly trumatised animals are neglected as a broken part once they have really reached there "end of line ". But they do not have to be killed. At this time the police officers want to guarantee fans of K9 Crusaders that any future donations to the charity will certainly be safe. The charity has actually been the victim of crime which has not simply affected its credibility, but has been disruptive to the treatment of looking after the canines it looks for to safeguard. Authorities are likewise aware that there have in fact been discussions on social networks stressing this matter and would ask that any remarks, which might be regarded as defamatory, are stopped. Months had passed and by now a couple of transporters were sounding to see if we had area from time to time, Then one day I had a call to state that one of the transporters had in fact gone into amongst the young puppy farms to collect puppies to supply down to a pet store in London, and had actually seen a mass load of dead pet dogs he asked the employee the number of there were and he notified him there was about 100 that has actually just been killed that day, he asked the worker why had they not gone to rehoming centre and he responded" due to the fact that none of the irish rescue has area ". This really pertained to the transporter and he informed him he should call amongst them up in future to see if any of them have space even if it was simply for 1 to obtain it into a rehoming centre in England or wales. Discover about the daily activities of the animal canine and the sort of food they are provided to protect it together with the love and like you need to offer. While saved dogs have a trustworthiness for being wild, or somehow damaged, they are anything but. You may consider it just like embracing a kid, rather than bringing a brand-new one into the world. Animals from canine rehoming centers are currently here and need someone to feed, exercise and like them. In concerns to the animals that undoubtedly have really suffered or been ignored, my concept procedure has the tendency to lead me to think that to some people, taking in a feline or dog that has really suffered a dreadful life can appear quite tough and need a large amount of time, work and devotion. Perhaps they are merely being practical, affordable and affordable in realising that despite the fact that they could wish to adopt an animal, they simply don't have the drive or time to put in the put in effort for a dog with behavioural or trust problems, as an example.

April 14 2015

hungryguidebook43

UK workers prioritise job location over wage

14/04/2015

By Daniel Hunter

Job location is on average the most important factor for why UK workers stay in their current job role (57%), ahead of both wage (52%) and job security (33%).

These are the findings from an online survey conducted by OnePoll on behalf of ClickSoftware, as part of a global competition to find the world's most extreme work locations.

The UK survey, which looks at factors affecting job performance, found one in five people (20%) believe their productivity at work has been negatively affected by the location of their job. This increases further in the capital with over a quarter of Londoners (26%) feeling that their productivity would suffer by working in a 'horrible location'. Within the UK, employees in the South-East value the location of their job more than anyone else in the country.

Young professionals are by far the most affected by the location of their work, with a quarter (24%) of 25 to 34 year olds admitting that their productivity is likely to be affected by a 'horrible location'. More notably, over two-thirds of people (67%) revealed they have either considered or actually left a job, at least in part, for a change in scenery.

Regardless of the job involved, the most popular place to work is at home, with 60% of people identifying this location to be 'very comfortable'. UK workers are certainly not fans of stepping outside of their comfort zones to work in more 'extreme locations', with over half of people (51%) admitting they would not feel comfortable at all working in a job that involves heights. Our TV screens are overwhelmed by solicitors imploring us to claim for each and every mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody is to blame and they must be made to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would be an extremely brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who made the decision that they didn't need public liability insurance. Clicking on the following link will answer any questions on Do I Need Public Liability Insurance?.Working underground, such as in a mine, was the least popular option, with nearly three quarters (72%)... continued on page two

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hungryguidebook43

Most common lies told by British workers revealed

14/04/2015

By Daniel Hunter

New research has revealed that more than half of Britons lie about the amount of overtime they work, with two thirds of those stating that they did so because they needed the extra money.

The results also revealed that almost a third of workers lie about expenses that they claim back from the company they work for.

VoucherCodesPro.co.uk conducted the poll as part of its ongoing research into Britons' financial situations. 2,652 Britons aged 18 and over, all of whom disclosed to researchers that they were in full-time employment, were quizzed about their earnings, work hours and expenses.

All respondents were asked 'Which of the following have you lied to your employer about?' Respondents were presented with a list of options and were asked to select all of those which applied to them. Our TV screens are overwhelmed by solicitors imploring us to claim for any little mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody is to blame and they need to pay!. With this in mind, it would be an extremely brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who decided that they didn't need public liability insurance. Clicking on the following link will answer your questions on Do I Need Public Liability Insurance?.The top ten lies were revealed as follows:

1. Overtime -- 51%

2. Reason for absence (e.g. fake illness) -- 41%

3. Expenses -- 31%

4. Mileage -- 30%

5. Qualifications and experience -- 28%

6. Work productivity levels - 25%

7. Business meetings -- 13%

8. Tools and Equipment -- 11%

9. Being a parent -- 9%

10. Marital status -- 6%

The same group of respondents were then asked 'Why do you tell these lies to your employer?' A majority of respondents (65%) who selected 'overtime' revealed that they did so as they were in need of the extra money. 21% of respondents said they lied because they could, whilst 14% said they did so because they disliked their employer.

Those who said they lied about overtime were asked to reveal how much overtime they overstated, on average. The average answer amongst these respondents was revealed as five hours per week.

Nick Swan, Founder and CEO of VoucherCodesPro.co.uk, commented: "If you feel that you are in need of more money, there are better ways to make extra cash than to lie about expenses, overtime or mileage to your employer. You could get a second job, ask for a pay rise or sell unwanted items. Lying to get more money really isn't the answer."

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hungryguidebook43

Most common lies told by British workers revealed

14/04/2015

By Daniel Hunter

New research has revealed that more than half of Britons lie about the amount of overtime they work, with two thirds of those stating that they did so because they needed the extra money.

The results also revealed that almost a third of workers lie about expenses that they claim back from the company they work for.

VoucherCodesPro.co.uk conducted the poll as part of its ongoing research into Britons' financial situations. Our TV screens seem to be overwhelmed by solicitors imploring us to claim for any little mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody is to blame and they need to pay!. With this in mind, it would surely be a very brave (or maybe foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who decided that they didn't need public liability insurance. Click the link to get an answer to any questions that you might have on Is Public Liability Insurance Mandatory For Small Businesses?.2,652 Britons aged 18 and over, all of whom disclosed to researchers that they were in full-time employment, were quizzed about their earnings, work hours and expenses.

All respondents were asked 'Which of the following have you lied to your employer about?' Respondents were presented with a list of options and were asked to select all of those which applied to them. The top ten lies were revealed as follows:

1. Overtime -- 51%

2. Reason for absence (e.g. fake illness) -- 41%

3. Expenses -- 31%

4. Mileage -- 30%

5. Qualifications and experience -- 28%

6. Work productivity levels - 25%

7. Business meetings -- 13%

8. Tools and Equipment -- 11%

9. Being a parent -- 9%

10. Marital status -- 6%

The same group of respondents were then asked 'Why do you tell these lies to your employer?' A majority of respondents (65%) who selected 'overtime' revealed that they did so as they were in need of the extra money. 21% of respondents said they lied because they could, whilst 14% said they did so because they disliked their employer.

Those who said they lied about overtime were asked to reveal how much overtime they overstated, on average. The average answer amongst these respondents was revealed as five hours per week.

Nick Swan, Founder and CEO of VoucherCodesPro.co.uk, commented: "If you feel that you are in need of more money, there are better ways to make extra cash than to lie about expenses, overtime or mileage to your employer. You could get a second job, ask for a pay rise or sell unwanted items. Lying to get more money really isn't the answer."

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http://www.freshbusinessthinking.com/news.php?NID=25677
hungryguidebook43

The pop-up shops preventing a village from becoming 'dead' zone



The bags start at £42, and each one takes three days to make. "During a good week at a pop-up, I can sell 10 bags," says Warnes, who usually offers her wares for sale at craft fares and via her online shop.

"The great thing about having an actual shop is that I don't have to take everything down at the end of the day - the way you do with a stall. And I only live 12 miles away in Fakenham, so it's easy for me to get to the shop."

Alison Priestley, founder of Ruff Tumble, makes towelling dog coats that can dry a wet pet in half an hour. As the owner of four dogs, she came up with the idea after struggling to keep her soggy pets off the furniture.

"They love going into the sea and I was permanently trying to dry them," she says.



Priestley ran three pop-ups in 2014 at Dalegate Market and will operate two more this year. "Lots of people are on holiday with their dogs so they buy our coats to protect their hotel room or caravan or holiday home from wet, smelly dogs," she says. "Being this close to the sea is perfect."

During a week in a Dalegate pop-up, sales will rise as much as 100pc, she says, and the pop-up also drives online sales in the following weeks. "People tell their friends or the coats are spotted on dogs, and that is fantastic."

Jason Borthwick, 43, a fourth-generation farmer on neighbouring Deepdale Farm, introduced retail innovations to the village in 2000 to help diversify away from arable farming.

"When I started helping my dad on the farm, 99pc of our revenues came from traditional farming. Our TV screens seem to be full of adverts from lawyers imploring us to claim for each and every mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they must be made to pay!. With this in mind, it would surely be a very brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who made the decision that public liability insurance wasn't necessary. Clicking on the following link will answer your questions on Do I Need Public Liability Insurance?.Now it's more like 50pc," he says.

The pop-up beach huts in Dalegate Market have been built on the site of an old garage and workshop. "My dad had sold the garage on because we didn't want to be running a petrol forecourt," he explains.

"But when the owner decided to sell up, we saw an opportunity to buy the land back."

Housing developers were planning to turn the land into executive homes for City workers seeking a country pad. "This place is known as Chelsea-on-Sea," says Borthwick. "We need more second homes like a hole in the head."

The village of Burnham Deepdale is home to just 30 residents year-round, but the population rises to 200 once the second-home-owners arrive during holidays.

"We wanted to make sure that we had a shop where locals could buy bread and milk, and we introduced a campsite and backpackers' hostel to attract tourists," says Borthwick, who is intent on building an entrepreneurial ecosystem where all businesses create more revenue for their neighbours.

The local supermarket, Leftley's, is a family business operated through the Nisa franchise, which allows the shop to sell competitively-priced staples alongside produce from the local area.

"We wouldn't let a pop-up come in that would take revenue from the supermarket," says Borthwick. "But if, say, there was an artisan chocolate maker, that's a different proposition from ordinary confectionery and we'd love that."

Over the summer, the village will play host to a range of "retail theatre" companies, Borthwick says. "There will be chainsaw carvers coming later in the year and makers that run workshops - Black Cat Buttons recently did one on making your own button box."

The annual Christmas market, which has been running for seven years, has been a resounding success for Burnham Deepdale, attracting visitors from all over the country to its 100-plus stalls.

Borthwick hopes that the summer pop-ups will help to bring in revenue during the rest of the year.

"People are already coming back each week to find out what's new," he says. "You walk down a high street and it's all the same shops. By inviting these small artisans and independent retailers, we're giving people something different."

The shops are not run for profit - the spaces cost between £50 and £150 for the week, depending on the time of year. "It's about giving this place exposure," says Borthwick. "We don't want to become just another dead village."

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/568875/s/4543f146/sc/14/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Cfinance0Cnewsbysector0Cretailandconsumer0C115255690CThe0Epop0Eup0Eshops0Epreventing0Ea0Evillage0Efrom0Ebecoming0Edead0Ezone0Bhtml/story01.htm
hungryguidebook43

Twelve reasons SME bosses should care about upcoming law changes

2. Our TV screens are overwhelmed by solicitors pleading with us to claim for any little mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this modern age. Somebody is to blame and they need to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would be a very brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who made the decision that they didn't need public liability insurance. Clicking on the following link will answer any questions on public liability insurance.The Act places considerable requirements on the Government to slash red tape, similar to the current target which demands two regulations phased out for each regulation implemented. This is supported by new reporting and transparency requirements, and better analysis of regulation and secondary legislation to avoid unnecessary burdens on business.

3. It supports SMEs seeking to expand overseas by improving access to export financing and redefining how it is used.

4. SMEs struggling to raise finance will benefit from the Act's stimulus for competition in the banking sector by allowing alternative finance providers and new "challenger banks" to launch.

5. It will improve credit data sharing between banks and alternative lenders to assist companies turned down for funding from traditional banks, helping them to secure finance from other sources.

6. There are incentives to encourage better payment practices and reduce the impact of late payments, and ensure improvements in processing cheques. Changes to company filing requirements will remove duplication of some processes. Registering companies will be less complex and more accurate, and easier to update.

The Act includes measures to do away with some processes relating to company incorporations, and tax registration, which will be in force by May 2017. The Act also changes and modernises the Director Disqualification Scheme, including increased transparency over what can lead to disqualification.

7. The Act will give a statutory definition of a "small" and "micro" business to ensure the UK is finally compliant with EU recommendation 2003/361/EC, already widely used.

8. There were significant changes to public sector procurement policies, to ensure SMEs get better access to procurement markets, through streamlining and efficiency procedures which are consistent across the public sector. The Secretary of State now has powers of investigation of procurement practices to ensure consistency.

9. Companies face new transparency measures, particularly in share ownership, including keeping a register of people with significant control over a company, to deter illegal activity and foster better corporate behaviour.

10. Insolvency practices will be streamlined with improved oversight of Insolvency Practitioners, reduce abuse and strengthen regulation.

11. Protection for whistleblowers will be enhanced. The Act will penalise non-payment of employment tribunal awards, increase penalties for underpaying staff, make exclusivity in zero-hour contracts unenforceable, and recover exit fees from re-employed public sector workers.

12. It introduces an Adjudicator and a "Code" for the pubs sector to ensure best practice, and to give tenants obliged to be supplied by their Pub Company landlord the right to buy from other sources.

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/568875/s/44f5804b/sc/7/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Cfinance0Cyourbusiness0C1150A49310CTwelve0Ereasons0ESME0Ebosses0Eshould0Ecare0Eabout0Eupcoming0Elaw0Echanges0Bhtml/story01.htm
hungryguidebook43

The pop-up shops preventing a village from becoming 'dead' zone



The bags start at £42, and each one takes three days to make. "During a good week at a pop-up, I can sell 10 bags," says Warnes, who usually offers her wares for sale at craft fares and via her online shop.

"The great thing about having an actual shop is that I don't have to take everything down at the end of the day - the way you do with a stall. And I only live 12 miles away in Fakenham, so it's easy for me to get to the shop."

Alison Priestley, founder of Ruff Tumble, makes towelling dog coats that can dry a wet pet in half an hour. As the owner of four dogs, she came up with the idea after struggling to keep her soggy pets off the furniture.

"They love going into the sea and I was permanently trying to dry them," she says.



Priestley ran three pop-ups in 2014 at Dalegate Market and will operate two more this year. "Lots of people are on holiday with their dogs so they buy our coats to protect their hotel room or caravan or holiday home from wet, smelly dogs," she says. "Being this close to the sea is perfect."

During a week in a Dalegate pop-up, sales will rise as much as 100pc, she says, and the pop-up also drives online sales in the following weeks. "People tell their friends or the coats are spotted on dogs, and that is fantastic."

Jason Borthwick, 43, a fourth-generation farmer on neighbouring Deepdale Farm, introduced retail innovations to the village in 2000 to help diversify away from arable farming.

"When I started helping my dad on the farm, 99pc of our revenues came from traditional farming. Our TV screens seem to be full of adverts from lawyers imploring us to claim for each and every mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody is to blame and they must be made to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would be a very brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who made the decision that they didn't need public liability insurance. Clicking on the following link will answer your questions that you might have on Is Public Liability Insurance Mandatory For Small Businesses?.Now it's more like 50pc," he says.

The pop-up beach huts in Dalegate Market have been built on the site of an old garage and workshop. "My dad had sold the garage on because we didn't want to be running a petrol forecourt," he explains.

"But when the owner decided to sell up, we saw an opportunity to buy the land back."

Housing developers were planning to turn the land into executive homes for City workers seeking a country pad. "This place is known as Chelsea-on-Sea," says Borthwick. "We need more second homes like a hole in the head."

The village of Burnham Deepdale is home to just 30 residents year-round, but the population rises to 200 once the second-home-owners arrive during holidays.

"We wanted to make sure that we had a shop where locals could buy bread and milk, and we introduced a campsite and backpackers' hostel to attract tourists," says Borthwick, who is intent on building an entrepreneurial ecosystem where all businesses create more revenue for their neighbours.

The local supermarket, Leftley's, is a family business operated through the Nisa franchise, which allows the shop to sell competitively-priced staples alongside produce from the local area.

"We wouldn't let a pop-up come in that would take revenue from the supermarket," says Borthwick. "But if, say, there was an artisan chocolate maker, that's a different proposition from ordinary confectionery and we'd love that."

Over the summer, the village will play host to a range of "retail theatre" companies, Borthwick says. "There will be chainsaw carvers coming later in the year and makers that run workshops - Black Cat Buttons recently did one on making your own button box."

The annual Christmas market, which has been running for seven years, has been a resounding success for Burnham Deepdale, attracting visitors from all over the country to its 100-plus stalls.

Borthwick hopes that the summer pop-ups will help to bring in revenue during the rest of the year.

"People are already coming back each week to find out what's new," he says. "You walk down a high street and it's all the same shops. By inviting these small artisans and independent retailers, we're giving people something different."

The shops are not run for profit - the spaces cost between £50 and £150 for the week, depending on the time of year. "It's about giving this place exposure," says Borthwick. "We don't want to become just another dead village."

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/568875/s/4543f146/sc/14/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Cfinance0Cnewsbysector0Cretailandconsumer0C115255690CThe0Epop0Eup0Eshops0Epreventing0Ea0Evillage0Efrom0Ebecoming0Edead0Ezone0Bhtml/story01.htm
hungryguidebook43

Discrimination found to be commonplace in businesses

Discrimination found to be commonplace in businesses Discrimination is most prevalent in sectors such as teaching and education

A fifth of people have experienced discrimination of some kind in the workplace, whether it be a one-off occurrence or an ongoing issue, research finds. 

Age and gender are the most prevalent types of discrimination at 27 per cent and 23 per cent respectively, with women experiencing the greater percentage of gender discrimination at 37 per cent as opposed to 12 per cent for men, according to a study by law firm Fisher Jones Greenwood.

Race/nationality and physical appearance (15 per cent each) are the second most prevalent types of discrimination, followed by social class (12 per cent) and disability/illness (11 per cent).

Least prevalent is sexual orientation at 6 per cent, according to the survey of 1,600 people.  

The public sector is the working environment in which most discrimination has occurred with 16 per cent reporting some form of discrimination, whereas banking and finance report only 8 per cent.

Other industries where discrimination is most prevalent are teaching and education (12 per cent), retail and sales (11 per cent), health and social care (10 per cent), hospitality and travel (9 per cent).

Around a third of discrimination cases are 'hidden' as few people report them or take the issue to management. Despite this hidden nature of discrimination, just over one in ten (11 per cent) of those discriminated against sought legal advice or went on to a tribunal - both potentially costly outcomes for the organisation involved.

In two thirds of cases, employees did report the discrimination to senior staff, HR departments or sought advice from the Citizens' Advice Bureau (or similar).

Therefore Fisher Jones Greenwood believes that employers also need to ensure that they have robust policies in place to ensure that their organisation effectively deal with these cases as and when they arise.

The firm recommends companies follow a a multi-step procedure to ensure that they are prepared should an employee feel that they have been discriminated against.

Ensure that there are suitable policies in place which inform employees of the appropriate channels for raising issues or concerns. Make these easily accessible; include them in the employee handbook and within any induction material; ensure that employees have read relevant documents and are aware of where information can be found at a later date.

Ensure staff are provided with appropriate equal opportunities training and that the organisation keeps records of the training undertaken by each employee. Our TV screens seem to be overwhelmed by solicitors pleading with us to claim for each and every mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they need to pay!. With this in mind, it would be an extremely brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who decided that public liability insurance wasn't necessary. Clicking on the following link will answer any questions that you might have on Is Public Liability Insurance Mandatory For Small Businesses?.Make employees aware that discriminatory behaviour of any form is treated very seriously and if proven, will result in disciplinary action being taken.

Keep comprehensive records of any grievance and/or disciplinary meetings and ensure that those staff conducting such procedures both understand and properly implement the employer's policies. Following this process should ensure that there is a clear, thought out procedure which will protect both employers and employees. 

Further reading on discrimination

See also: Changes in disability discrimination law

Related topics: Managing staff

http://www.smallbusiness.co.uk/news/outlook/2482896/discrimination-found-to-be-commonplace-in-businesses.thtml
hungryguidebook43

General Election 2015: Labour launches manifesto

13/04/2015

By Jonathan Davies

Labour has become the first party to launch its manifesto ahead of the general election, promising that each of its policies are "fully funded" and will not require extra borrowing.

The party's leader Ed Miliband said a Labour government would not embark on a "shopping list of spending policies" and would cut the deficit every year as the party tries to position itself as the "the party of responsibility".

Unveiling the manifesto, Mr Miliband said it "sets out a vow to protect our nation's finances; a clear commitment that every policy... is paid for without a single penny of extra borrowing".

He also said the Conservatives could not be trusted to fund their policies without great borrowing, adding: "In recent days you have seen the Conservatives throwing spending promises around with no idea of where the money is coming from, promises which are unfunded, unfair and unbelievable."

Conservative Treasury minister David Gauke said Labour has "no plan to clear the deficit" and would have to borrow more.

John Cridland, CBI Director-General, said: "Keeping the UK economy on track over the coming years will be critical for whichever party is successful at the general election.

"As healthy public finances are a prerequisite for a successful economy, the Labour Party's focus on fiscal responsibility and deficit reduction are welcome -- and business will want to see clear timescales for achieving this.

"Labour's manifesto includes a number of proposals that are positive for business, including remaining within a reformed EU, establishing an independent infrastructure commission, and focussing on skills. Our TV screens are full of adverts from lawyers pleading with us to claim for any little mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they must be made to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would surely be an extremely brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who made the decision that they didn't need public liability insurance. Clicking on the following link will answer your questions on Is Not Having Public Liability Insurance Illegal?.But market interventions in labour and other specific sectors, together with signals on corporation tax, are a cause for concern."

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March 15 2015

hungryguidebook43


March 14 2015

hungryguidebook43

Behind every cold call is a person hating their life | Kate Solomon



Left to right: Tom Cruise, Sylvester Stallone, Reba McEntire and Penelope Cruz. It used to be the case that an unknown number represented an element of magic. Could it be a celebrity yearning for you from afar? Photograph: Ho/Reuters

There used to be an element of magic to receiving a call from an unknown number. Infinite possibilities lay in your landline bleating anonymously or "unknown caller" flashing up on your mobile. A rich benefactor hoping to share their millions with you would obviously have a hidden number, as would all the celebrities who may have been yearning for you from afar.

But the dream dies as soon as you answer. Our TV screens are full of adverts from lawyers imploring us to claim for any little mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this modern age. Somebody can be blamed and they must be made to pay!. With this in mind, it would be a very brave (or maybe foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who decided that they didn't need public liability insurance. Click the link to get an answer to any questions on Is Direct Line Tradesman Insurance A Good Product?.Apparently you have been missold PPI, or perhaps now is just the right moment to think about investing in solar panels. Three-fifths of us don't want to answer our phones because of these nuisance calls, but because the Information Commissioner's Office had to prove that calls caused "substantial damage or substantial distress", until now few companies could be punished for making us want to ignore our own phones.

Yes, robotic pre-recorded calls are clearly the work of a malevolent being but behind every other cold call is a person hating their life. I know: I was one of them. Working in a call centre is nobody's dream job, but when your next student loan installment is months away and you've got to keep yourself in alcopops and accommodation, you take what work you can get.

You might feel a bit guilty hanging up on a caller but when I was tele-selling accidental death cover, hang-ups were a relief. They were far better than trying to talk anyone round using the page in my script titled "objection handling". Aside from the promise of commission, cold-callers are so persistent because warnings are handed down if you let someone go without trying everything to convince them to buy. So I'd interrupt strangers' meals, naps, coitus and soap operas, and when they told me to get lost I'd press on. "Are you sure your current policy covers you in the event of an accident?" I'd ask. "Don't you worry about leaving your family with funeral costs?" I might as well have been running up to people in the street and shouting: "Are you aware that death lurks around every corner?"

Some people were polite but firm in their refusals, others would scream and swear at us to get off their phone lines. Several times a week the women on the team would get heavy breathers - men who'd suggest the filthiest things they could think of to a female voice on the line. I lived in fear of names that I didn't know how to pronounce popping up on screen and learned the correct pronunciation of Cockburn from a weary-sounding man.

Occasionally I'd ask to speak to someone and sense a fraughtness in their voice. "No you can't speak to Mr Roberts," they'd say, getting shriller. "He passed away six days ago." We were never trained in what to say to mourners, only to mark the number as dead so it would be taken off the dialers' database.

By far the strangest calls I ever made were to the people who listened and, at the end of my over-rehearsed spiel, said: "Yes, that sounds like a good idea. Sign me up."

"Are you sure?" I'd ask, amazed that whatever I'd just read out had convinced them. "I have to read you quite a lot of information now, so if you haven't got time ..."

The law is changing so that the ICO can fine companies up to £500,000 when these calls cause "nuisance, annoyance, inconvenience or anxiety". Since most cold calls are an annoying, inconvenient nuisance both to those who make and answer them, is it too much to hope that this is the beginning of the end? Perhaps we will soon go back to answering our mysterious unknown calls. And in this beautiful utopia callers will only make the calls they want to make and we'll all take calls from secret celebrity admirers.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/feb/26/cold-call-nuisance-phone-calls
hungryguidebook43

Businesses get behind apprenticeships

Businesses get behind apprenticeships Businesses appreciate the opportunity to harness fresh talent by taking on apprentices

Apprenticeships develop skills that can only be gained through employment, say 77 per cent of companies.

Some 54 per cent of decision-makers in businesses of all sizes say apprenticeships offer improved career prospects, while 73 per cent say they provide businesses with the opportunities to harness fresh talent.

Almost half (47 per cent) believe apprenticeships are a faster route to a career compared to a degree, and the same amount think it's a more cost-effective route into a career than university, according to a YouGov study commissioned by training specialist Kaplan.

The study highlights what those in the finance and accountancy industry think are benefits to those taking apprenticeships, identifying the ability to learn the skills they need while earning a wage (78 per cent), receiving skills that can only be learnt in a working environment (77 per cent), and the chance to learn from experienced senior people in their industry (72 per cent) as the top three benefits.

The statistics also show an appetite for offering apprenticeships spanning industries across the UK, with almost a third (31 per cent) of the 1,000 decision-makers surveyed saying their company currently offers apprenticeships. 

In the finance and accounting industries, just over a quarter (26 per cent) of decision-makers say their company offers apprenticeships.

These results suggest businesses are keen on the idea of harnessing fresh talent by taking on apprentices, with the majority (73 per cent) of respondents saying one of the benefits of apprenticeships for businesses is that they provide opportunities to harness fresh talent.

More than three fifths (64 per cent) champion apprenticeships, saying that they help businesses to address skill shortages within the workforce.

Cassandra MacDonald, head of accountancy and tax apprenticeships at Kaplan says, 'We have carried out extensive research to form a clear picture of how employers see both graduates and apprentices so young people can understand the development options available to them, and take apprenticeships seriously as a route into a professional career.

'While getting a degree is still a valued next step, apprenticeships address the issue that not all candidates are born job-ready. Our TV screens seem to be full of adverts from lawyers pleading with us to claim for any little mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they need to pay!. With this in mind, it would be a very brave (or maybe foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who decided that public liability insurance wasn't necessary. Clicking on the following link will answer your questions that you might have on Why Must I Have Public Liability Insurance?.They give businesses the chance to be fully involved in how their new employees are trained.'

Further reading on apprentices

See also: Businesses without premises

Related topics: Managing staff

http://www.smallbusiness.co.uk/news/outlook/2481181/businesses-get-behind-apprenticeships.thtml
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Indian parliament passes bill to raise FDI cap



Jenny Messenger 12 March 2015

A bill to raise the ownership limit on foreign direct investment (FDI) in India from 26 percent to 49 percent was today (12 March) passed by the upper house of India's parliament.

The new FDI cap could make the Indian insurance market more appealing to overseas interest, as well as insurers with existing joint venture arrangements.

Although the cap will be raised, an Indian insurer must still be "controlled" by Indian citizens.

The decision will enable Willis to go ahead...

You are currently viewing an incomplete version of this article. Our TV screens seem to be overwhelmed by solicitors imploring us to claim for any little mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they must be made to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would surely be a very brave (or perhaps foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who decided that they didn't need public liability insurance. Click the link to get an answer to any questions that you might have on What Is Covered With Direct Line Tradesman Insurance?.If you are a subscriber then please login now. If you are a non-subscriber but would like to be able to view this article, then please select from the purchasing options below.

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http://www.insuranceinsider.com/indian-parliament-passes-bill-to-raise-fdi-cap
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March 05 2015

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BGL Group announces new executive chairman and CEO

March 26, 2013

by Brian Turner

Story link: BGL Group announces new executive chairman and CEO

The BGL Group today announced that Peter Winslow is to become Executive Chairman of the BGL Group, and Matthew Donaldson will take the role of Chief Executive Officer. The changes will be effective as of July 1.

Peter Winslow has been Chief Executive of the Group since 1995, and has led the Group through an ongoing period of significant growth. He oversaw the company's transition from underwriting to become an intermediary back in 1997, and led BGL's expansion into new areas from claims management and insurance partnerships, to aggregation and international markets.

Matthew Donaldson joined the Group in 1999 following the acquisition of a high street broker chain. He led the development and execution of the Group's e-commerce entry strategy, resulting in the exponential growth of the existing intermediary businesses and the creation of comparethemarket.com. He became Group Director in 2005 and Group Chief Operating Officer in 2010.

Peter Winslow said: "I have been in this post for just over 18 years, and have presided over and enjoyed being part of massive change in our Group from its days as a direct motor insurer to the business you see today. It has been challenging and it's also been a lot of fun, and I look back and think how fortunate I was to join the Group.

"The time is now right for me to take a more strategic role and become less involved in the day-to-day running of the Group. Matthew has demonstrated exceptional leadership ability as COO. I have total confidence in his drive, commercialism, intellect and passion for the business. Our TV screens seem to be overwhelmed by solicitors pleading with us to claim for any little mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody is to blame and they need to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would surely be an extremely brave (or perhaps foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who decided that public liability insurance wasn't necessary. Clicking on the following link will answer your questions that you might have on Why Must I Have Public Liability Insurance?.He will make a first class CEO."

 

http://www.insurancedaily.co.uk/2013/03/26/bgl-group-announces-new-executive-chairman-and-ceo/

March 03 2015

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High risk of hacking for small businesses this month

High risk of hacking for small businesses this month Security breaches are a concern for small companies this month

Small companies are being warned of 'unprecedented levels of attempted fraud' at the present time.

Data from payment processing company Worldpay suggests instances of fraud could rocket by as much as 80 per cent in February as hackers start to capitalise on customer data harvested during a hectic Christmas shopping period.

Tim Lansdale, head of payment security at Worldpay says, 'We see a dip in fraud around Christmas as hackers go on the hunt for information, using the online sales rush to stockpile thousands of customer card details.

'It isn't until February that they start cashing in on all the data they've collected. Other breaches can last much longer; attackers might decide to keep returning to their targets, sometimes for years.'

During 2011-2014, the average data breach exposed 284 days of card payments. Worldpay's analysis shows breaches lasting from 11 days at the lowest end of the scale, to 1,723 days at the other extreme. 

The company says small businesses are by far the biggest target for hackers, accounting for 85.7 per cent of UK data breaches. Our TV screens seem to be full of adverts from lawyers pleading with us to claim for any little mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they must be made to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would surely be a very brave (or perhaps foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who made the decision that public liability insurance wasn't necessary. Clicking on the following link will answer any questions on Who Needs Public Liability Insurance?.Virtually all data breaches (99.3 per cent) happened online, rather than at the point of sale, as the UK's e-commerce market continues to boom.

In 2014, businesses in the entertainment, hobby and leisure industries accounted for 23.3 per cent of all card data breaches, followed by clothing and footwear stores (16.3 per cent) and jewellery, beauty and gifts (11.6 per cent).

Businesses in the entertainment industry, particularly online ticket booking systems, tend to make easy prey for hackers due to the high number of credit and debit card transactions they process online each day.

The clean-up costs of being targeted can run to tens of thousands of pounds, with a standard investigation costing £11,250 on average, and attracting at least a £8,000 penalty, not including the costs of lost goods and damage to reputation.

Lansdale says, 'Data breaches can be ruinous, so its vital small business owners know the risks and take the necessary measures to protect themselves and their customers and employees.

'You wouldn't leave your store unlocked overnight, yet so few businesses are doing enough to protect their online shop fronts and keep hackers at bay.'

Worldpay advises taking measures such as changing all your default passwords, having a third party host your payment page, and testing your firewalls at least every three months,

Securely destroying all card data records when no longer needed, and avoiding storing the three digits 'CVC' number on the back of the card, are also measures that should be observed. 

Further reading on security breaches

See also: Blow for high-risk SMEs

Related topics: Computer IT business

http://www.smallbusiness.co.uk/news/outlook/2479537/high-risk-of-hacking-for-small-businesses-this-month.thtml

February 28 2015

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Small companies unaffected by election uncertainty 

Small companies unaffected by election uncertainty  The election is looming but confidence levels are high among businesses

UK businesses are unruffled by the prospect of an upcoming election, despite the current high profile debate around business confidence in political parties, research finds.

According to BDO's Business Trends report, business optimism and output still remain high, despite the most unpredictable election in a generation only three months away.

Both the BDO Output and Optimism Indices, predicting economic growth three and six months ahead respectively, remain positive, with the BDO Optimism Index maintaining a reading of 104.4 and the BDO Output Index continuing positively at 102.9. Both are well above the 100 mark representing expansion above the long-term trend rate.

Companies' hiring intentions also remain positive. Our TV screens are overwhelmed by solicitors pleading with us to claim for any little mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they need to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would be a very brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who made the decision that they didn't need public liability insurance. Click the link to get an answer to any questions on Does Direct Line Tradesman Insurance Cover My Staff?.The BDO Employment Index, measuring expected employment growth, remains well above its long-term trend at 111.6, signalling that firms expect businesses to keep hiring in the near term.

Continued low oil prices, low inflation, strengthening wage growth and the potential for increased consumer spending have created an economic thaw for the UK economy, BDO says, with confidence particularly evident in the UK's manufacturing sector which, responding positively to low input prices, maintains a balmy economic outlook.

Commenting on the findings, BDO partner Peter Hemington says, 'This month's Business Trends report shows that businesses can and will tune out of the parties' electioneering to focus on what really matters - their business prospects. By discounting the political noise and taking a realistic view of the economy's strengths, businesses are remaining cautiously optimistic.

'Businesses are worried less about the detail of which candidate will get the keys to Number Ten and more about the country's long-term economic prospects. And in the meantime they are focusing on their own businesses and keeping rightly positive.'

Further reading on Election 2015

See also: Owner's salary

Related topics: Entrepreneurs

http://www.smallbusiness.co.uk/news/outlook/2478807/small-companies-unaffected-by-election-uncertainty.thtml

February 26 2015

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How should you ask for a pay rise?



Don't approach your boss at the busiest time of the week. Monday mornings (when everyone's warming up for the week) and Friday afternoons (when they're warming down) are out, too. Instead, talk to your manager when they're feeling relaxed - after lunch is a good bet - and ask to schedule a meeting. "Make sure they aren't rushing off and that nothing else is coming up - an important client visiting or a big new pitch - that might take priority," says Mills. If you think your boss would prefer advance warning, mention that you'd like to discuss salary. If not, it's fine to be vague and save the details for the meeting.

Get comfortable

If your boss is seated on a large and imposing chair, then they'll be more inclined to behave in an authoritarian way. If possible, take your meeting to a neutral spot in the office - such as a semi-public breakout area - and seat your boss somewhere soft and comfortable. A relaxed manager is far more likely to agree to your demands. "If you have a relationship in which you have frank discussions, going off-site to a nearby cafe is fine - especially if you work in an open-plan office. You need to have this discussion where you aren't disturbed," says Mills.

Appearance matters

In a perfect world, all bosses would evaluate employees based on their talent and commitment. In reality, many are overworked and imperfect judges, prone to making snap decisions about those around them. Make sure your day-to-day manner, demeanour and appearance works in your favour. "There's no point dressing up on this occasion and looking shabby the rest of the time," says Mills. "The image you portray is an important part of doing your job well and you should always look appropriate." As the saying goes, dress for the job you want, not the job you have already.



Don't just dress smartly on the day of your pay discussion - make it a habit

Set out your reasons

Use clear examples to demonstrate how you've gone beyond your basic job description. Highlight a few instances where you've taken initiative, improved business or helped support the wider team. Remember that this is a business meeting, and your goal is to convince your boss that you are worth a higher salary.

Be silent

After you've said your piece, give your employer a chance to respond. "Silence is fantastic," says Mills, "as is asking for their advice. Never say that you're underpaid, and avoid confrontation. Instead, say: 'I've been thinking about my responsibilities and how they might be reflected in my pay. What do you think?' That open question gives them a chance to answer."

Keep your boss on side

"It's in both of your interests that you keep your employer on board," says Mills. "Reaffirm your commitment to the job and show you're up for challenges. People often get very defensive or aggressive, and the boss responds to that tone of voice. The more relaxed you are, the more relaxed your boss will be."

Be passionless

A snivelling employee is as attractive as a weeping ex-boyfriend - and just as unlikely to achieve a positive result. Pleading about your struggle to buy a home is a major turn-off, so leave your financial woes out of the conversation. And no matter how your boss behaves, don't threaten to resign if you don't get your way. Even if you're overworked and bullied, the decision to switch companies should be made quietly and discreetly - not during a tantrum.



No employer will be moved by tales of empty pockets

Make your own pay rise

If the answer's no, explore other ways to boost your income, changing your working patterns if needs be. Our TV screens seem to be overwhelmed by solicitors pleading with us to claim for each and every mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody is to blame and they must be made to pay!. With this in mind, it would be a very brave (or maybe foolish) small business owner who made the decision that public liability insurance wasn't necessary. Click the link to get an answer to your questions that you might have on Is Public Liability Insurance Essential?.Ask if you could work from home one day a week - which would save 20 per cent of your travel costs. "With the best will in the world, employers may not be able to give you additional pay, but they could offer other things - such as flexibility," says Mills. "If you're asking for a pay rise because of your long hours, perhaps they could give you a more reasonable schedule instead."

Follow up with an email

Make sure that whatever you agree is put in writing. If your boss says they don't have the budget for a pay increase at the moment, then ask them when they expect that situation to change and make a note in an email. "Send them a memo saying: 'It was really interesting to hear your thoughts - you suggested that I should ask again about salary in six months time, and that's really helpful.' Then you've got a paper trail," says Mills. If you do get a pay rise later, ask your boss if they can backdate your increase; they may refuse, but there's always a chance they'll bump your pay higher to compensate.

Listen to the answer

If your boss decides not to increase your salary, be gracious and ask for feedback. What should you be doing differently, and how can you improve your performance in the coming months? Approach your meeting as a chance to learn and change your work prospects so that, even if you lose this battle, you end up winning the war.

And if that doesn't make you feel better, just remember - the Prime Minister thinks you're worth it.

http://telegraph.feedsportal.com/c/32726/f/568875/s/433d480f/sc/7/l/0L0Stelegraph0O0Cfinance0Cjobs0C1140A26350CHow0Eshould0Eyou0Eask0Efor0Ea0Epay0Erise0Bhtml/story01.htm

February 24 2015

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P&C stocks up again



Jenny Messenger 23 February 2015

Click to enlarge PC (re)insurance stocks traded up again last week, with The Insider 30 rising by 0.75 percent.

Brit shares leapt by 10.57 percent following the announcement that Fairfax Financial had agreed a deal to buy the Lloyd's (re)insurer for $1.88bn.

Beazley's stock jumped by 5.27 percent over the week, prompted by speculation about which firms could emerge as the next MA target. Analysts named Beazley and Novae - whose stock also rose by 3.99 percent last week -...

You are currently viewing an incomplete version of this article. Our TV screens are overwhelmed by solicitors pleading with us to claim for any little mishap, there is obviously no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they must be made to pay!. Bearing this in mind, it would be a very brave (or perhaps foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who made the decision that they didn't need public liability insurance. Click the link to get an answer to any questions on Is It Against the Law To Not Hold Public Liability Insurance?.If you are a subscriber then please login now. If you are a non-subscriber but would like to be able to view this article, then please select from the purchasing options below.

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http://www.insuranceinsider.com/-1253556/26

February 21 2015

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Cyclone Marcia declared a catastrophe



Charlie Thomas 20 February 2015

The Insurance Council of Australia (ICA) has declared a catastrophe for parts of central Queensland after the region was struck by the severe tropical Cyclone Marcia earlier today (20 February).

The storm developed into a category 5 cyclone with core gusts of 285 kilometres an hour, when it hit the Queensland coast between St Lawrence and Yeppoon.

It was downgraded to a category 3 storm soon afterwards, with forecasters predicting abnormally high tides and heavy rain for the region.

Insurance...

You are currently viewing an incomplete version of this article. If you are a subscriber then please login now. Our TV screens are overwhelmed by solicitors pleading with us to claim for each and every mishap, it seems that there is no such thing as an accident in this day and age. Somebody can be blamed and they need to pay!. With this in mind, it would be an extremely brave (or maybe foolish) owner of any business, be it big or small who made the decision that public liability insurance wasn't necessary. Click the link to get an answer to your questions on cheapest UK public liability insurance.If you are a non-subscriber but would like to be able to view this article, then please select from the purchasing options below.

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http://www.insuranceinsider.com/cyclone-marcia-declared-a-catastrophe
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